Reading

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If you ask me, I will tell you that there are two seasons of reading necessary for everyone. The first season, we read to build conviction; and the second? We read generally for contribution to our knowledge base. Without the former, the latter will lead to uncertainty, misery and relativity.

How can you ever be objective about what you read when you have never had a chance to build your convictions? This is something we do like the first 20 years of life and we usually get to read more of religious materials or whatever is more emphasised in our cultures. Even when you are not planning to build your conviction, the kind of reading you do in the first half of life, which is more adventurous in the first 20 to 30 years, will determine your ideals and convictions. That’s why you must have noticed that you don’t believe everything you read. That’s because in the second half of life, reading is basically subjective to what we have already believed.

This is not bad at all if the convictions are sound and based on truth. With books, authors seek to raise a vibrant successor for their ideas who will champion the new implications of their old thoughts and expand the applications of the same in increasing formats.

In reading, we find ourselves becoming intellectual descendants of certain authors. We rate ourselves by our abilities to write along the same lines as those experimented by the old sages. When we have touched by practical experience the light of truth in our scholarly pilgrimage, we become a better character of enlightenment than all the letterings of a lifetime’s worth of reading. We don’t only become fluent in our oratorical presentation of truth, we ourselves become incarnations of the truth we have been taught and are being taught in our honourable aspirations.

I think this is just the beginning of a long treatise on the discipline of reading. Let’s see how it goes…

Credit: Image from Google

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